Document Library

Last update of this page: February 15, 2017, 3:40 pm ET

NOTE FOR MISSION 12: Mission 12 documents will not be available in this Library until program start on September 5, 2017, but we expect only very slight revisions compared to the Mission 11 documents available below.

NOTE TO ALL MISSION 11 TO ISS COMMUNITIES
All documents in this Library are updated for Mission 11 to ISS.

On September 2, 2016, and with a revision on September 6, 2016, the Mission 11 community leadership across the 21 Mission 11 communities were provided the UserID and Password needed to download and use the 10 documents found in Section 3 of this Document Library with the understanding that the documents still reflected Mission 10 to ISS. NCESSE stated that no significant revisions were expected to these documents from Mission 10 to Mission 11. This has been the case for all but one document, the “NanoRacks List of Problematic Samples” which now describes a likely need for any student team that wants to use fluids and solids on this list to conduct a long duration Compatibility Test. An email alerting all Mission 11 Community Program Directors across the Mission 11 communities to this new requirement was sent out on 9/22/16. For the other 9 documents, 2 had no revisions, and 7 had only minor revisions limited to: an update of embedded links to Mission 11 web pages, replacement of ‘Mission 10’ with ‘Mission 11’ in the documents, and in two cases, replacement of a specific reference to Mission 7 with a generic ‘Missions to ISS’. All Mission 11 teachers are therefore directed to discard the 8 of 10 Mission 11 documents that were revised and replace them with the Mission 11 Documents now available below. The specific revisions to each document, from Mission 10 to Mission 11, are detailed in green text just below the document descriptions.    

For each document below, there is also a “Revision Date” listed in green text, which reflects the date for the correct document for Mission 11. It is this document that is now provided below for download. If you have already downloaded a document, and you want to make sure you have the right one for Mission 11, see if the “Revision Date” on the top of page 1 of your document matches the correct revision date provided below in green text. If not, download the correct document.

 

This Library provides SSEP participating communities all the documents necessary to conduct the SSEP. All documents referred to throughout this website, as well as additional resource documents, are found here. This Library serves as a single download point for all documents, and provides a description for each.

Most of these documents are password protected. Please see your SSEP Community Program Director for access, or Contact SSEP.

 

1. General Program Documents from NCESSE – Not Password Protected

a. At-A-Glance SSEP Program Overview
Three-page program overview of the SSEP for teachers, students, and stakeholders across your community. This is a MS Word document. If you open it on screen, all the links to relevant content on SSEP web pages will be active, and you can click on a link as needed to see the web content in the appropriate context. (Make sure to download the At-A-Glance document for the correct flight opportunity.)
Download: SSEP Mission 12 At-A-Glance Program Overview
Download: SSEP Mission 11 At-A-Glance Program Overview
Download: SSEP Mission 10 At-A-Glance Program Overview
Download: SSEP Mission 9 At-A-Glance Program Overview
Download: SSEP Mission 8 At-A-Glance Program Overview
Download: SSEP Mission 7 At-A-Glance Program Overview
Download: SSEP Mission 6 At-A-Glance Program Overview


b. Congressional Briefing Document

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and NanoRacks have given multiple SSEP briefings on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. SSEP was designed as a model U.S. national STEM education program, is a commercial space program, and provides for utilization of the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station for STEM education across the grade 5-16 pipeline – all of which is of interest to the United State Congress. This 2-page document is provided at those briefings.
Download: Congressional Briefing Document
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: January 2017

 

2. General Program Multimedia from NCESSE – Not Password Protected

a. VIDEO: Excellent SSEP Overview
NASA Pre-Flight Science Briefing: Dr. Jeff Goldstein, SSEP Program Director, SSEP Mission 6 to ISS Orb-3 Launch
October 26, 2014
The Briefing was conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, VA, on October 26, 2014, in advance of the launch of Orb-3 from the adjacent Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS). A live video feed of the rocket on Pad-0A can be seen behind the panelists. The Briefing was aired live on NASA TV.

Dr. Jeff Goldstein, Center Director for the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, and the creator and director of the SSEP, was one of the panelists on the Briefing, and provides an excellent overview of the SSEP, including the breadth and depth of effort put forward at the local level in each of the participating Mission 6 communities. He also provided an overview of the science to be conducted on ISS with the Yankee Clipper experiments. Dr. Goldstein is the NASA Principal Investigator (PI) on all SSEP experiment payloads.

Historical Background: Orb-3 was lost on launch on October 28, 2014 (see December 8, 2014 blog post). A replacement payload of 17 of 18 Mission 6 experiments, Yankee Clipper II, launched to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX CRS-5 on January 10, 2015, at 4:47 am EST, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL. This truly stunning, just 2-month turn-around was due to the remarkable efforts of all Mission 6 student flight teams, their teacher facilitators, NASA, NanoRacks, and NCESSE. After a month on ISS, Yankee Clipper II retuned to Earth on SpaceX CRS-5 Dragon on February 10, 2015, splashing down in the Pacific.

Pre-Flight Science Briefing – the SSEP Highlights:

  • SSEP Overview: at time stamp 10 min 50 sec
  • Question from Ken Kremer, Universe Today, on Sen. Tom Coburn’s (OK) comments on the SSEP: at time stamp 19 min 25 sec
  • Goldstein’s response to Ken Kremer’s question: at time stamp 20 min 35 sec (also see NCESSE’s formal response)

http://ssep.ncesse.org/2015/02/for-mission-8-communities-starting-ssep-nasa-pre-flight-briefing-with-an-ssep-overview-by-dr-jeff-goldstein-program-director/

 

b. VIDEO: Excellent SSEP Overview
NASA Mission Control Houston Interview: Dr. Jeff Goldstein, SSEP Program Director, SSEP Mission 4 to ISS Orb-1 Launch
January 10, 2014
http://ssep.ncesse.org/2014/01/nasa-jsc-interview-dr-jeff-goldstein-ssep-program-director-on-orb-1-launch/

 

c. VIDEO: Excellent SSEP Overview
Student Science is Underway with SpaceX
SPACEPORTS, May 23, 2012
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-0PUBbMdKo

 

d. FEATURE ARTICLES: Program Overview and Impact
Not Your Grandma’s Science Competition
Scientific American Frontiers, February 17, 2015, Amanda Baker
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/frontiers-for-young-minds/2015/02/17/not-your-grandmas-science-competition-part-2/

Viewport – Good News From Space
“[SSEP] may be the most important development for the future of the U.S. space program.”
General J.R. Dailey, Director, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
Air&Space Smithsonian, AirSpaceMag.com, January 01, 2014
http://www.airspacemag.com/space-exploration/Viewport-December-2013-232364871.html

 

e. POWERPOINT: General Program Overview
Updated for start of Mission 10 to ISS; used for 2016 Annual NASA Space Grant Director’s Conference.

Download: General Program Overview PowerPoint
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: March 1, 2016

 

3. Student Proposers Resource Library – Password Protected

a. To Students—Getting Started With Experiment Design
This document provides a recipe for getting students thinking about the process of experiment design.

Download: To Students—Getting Started With Experiment Design secured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: none
Correct Document Revision Date for Missions 10: September 13, 2015 (downloadable above)

 

b. Microgravity Science Background and Microgravity Experiment Case Studies Documents
These documents are meant to provide a primer on the categories of science that might be undertaken in microgravity and why, and to provide inspiration and guidance for what kinds of experiments might be proposed.

The Microgravity Science Background document provides a basic overview of science relevant to microgravity studies. It details 9 separate categories of science that can be addressed in microgravity, including: protein crystal growth, inorganic crystal growth, bacterial studies, fish/aquatic life, food product studies, seeds and plants, fluid diffusion, cell biology, and micro-encapsulation. For each category, this document provides the science background, why research in this category is important, why gravity is thought to play a role, and why experiments with gravity ‘turned-off’ have been done.

The Microgravity Experiment Case Studies document provides examples of experiments suitable for an SSEP mini-laboratory, in each of the nine science categories, and examples of experiments previously flown in SSEP mini-labs on the Space Shuttle.

Download: Microgravity Science Background secured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: embedded link to Blog Post You Want Me to Take a Bathroom Scale Where? changed to Mission 11 Post
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

Download: Microgravity Experiment Case Studies secured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: embedded links for Mini-laboratory Operation webpage changed from Mission 10 to Mission 11
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

 

c. Using Biologicals in SSEP Experiments: Dormant Forms, Fixatives and Growth Inhibitors Document
This document provides an understanding of why student researchers might need to use biological samples in dormant form. It also provides an understanding of why student researchers might want to terminate a biological experiment before their experiment leaves orbit and is re-introduced to a gravity environment, and how termination can be accomplished by introducing either a “fixative” which kills and preserves the biology, or by introducing a growth inhibitor which dramatically slows biological activity. This document also includes a wonderful overview of why collaboration with professional researchers in your area is so important.

Download: Using Biologicals in SSEP Experiments: Dormant Forms, Fixatives and Growth Inhibitors secured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: embedded link for Mini-laboratory Operation page changed from Mission 10 to Mission 11
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

 

d. Master List of Experiment Samples Document, and NanoRacks List of Problematic Samples Document
For SSEP on the Space Shuttle (STS-134 and STS-135), the MDA mini-lab used had “two levels of containment” to guard against an accidental breach and possible introduction of experiment samples (fluids and/or solids) into the crew cabin. A 2-level containment system is not deemed secure enough to allow potentially toxic samples to be used. Student proposers were therefore required to use only experiment samples on a Master List of Experiment Samples. This list included hundreds of allowed non-toxic and low toxicity samples grouped in nine categories of microgravity science research, yet still restricted experiment design. For SSEP on the International Space Station the Fluids Mixing Enclosure (FME) mini-lab has three levels of containment so that a Master List of Samples is no longer required, allowing greater freedom in terms of experiment design by student teams.

However, teachers and student teams participating in SSEP on STS-134 and STS-135 also recognized that the Master List of Experiment Samples was a great resource for experiment design. The List provided a starting point for student research on the fluids and solids that are typical of microgravity experiments across the nine disciplines covered. We are therefore making the Master List of Experiment Samples available for SSEP missions to the International Space Station, though there is no requirement for student teams to use the samples on the list.

Regarding the FME Mark II Mini-laboratory used on ISS, there are 4 categories of restrictions on the fluids and solids that can be used: 1) Prohibited Samples, 2) Hazardous Samples, 3) Problematic Samples, and 4) Technology. It is important for all student teams to fully understand the restrictions in each of these categories. For full details, please see Section 6 of the SSEP Mission 10 to ISS: Mini-Laboratory Operation page. In terms of Problematic Samples, the NanoRacks List of Problematic Samples provides a listing of samples (fluids/solids) that can adversely interact with the FME mini-lab’s silicone tube. These samples cannot be used in a 100% concentration; however, these materials may be used on a case-by case-basis depending on proposed concentrations, volumes, solutions, etc. NanoRacks therefore asks all student researchers to assess if any of their proposed fluids and solids are on this List, and if so, contact NCESSE as soon as such a substance is being considered for an experiment so that NanoRacks can review and rule on whether it can be used.

Download: Master List of Experiment Samplessecured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: references to SSEP Mission were made generic to “your Mission to ISS”
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

Download: NanoRacks List of Problematic Samplessecured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: critical modification – likely need for a Compatibility Test for fluids and solids on this list added to the document
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

 

e. Flight Experiment Proposal Guide, and Related Background Documents for Teachers and for Student Proposers
These documents provide the requirements for student team submission of a formal Flight Experiment Proposal.

The Flight Experiment Proposal Guide includes the required content and format for a proposal. The main body of each proposal will be no more than 5 pages, and include: 1) a write-up of the question to be addressed by the proposed experiment, and how it derives from current scientific understanding, and 2) a write-up of the experimental design, including: how the experiment addresses the question posed, why the proposed experiment samples (fluids and/or solids) were chosen, the experimental procedure, and the proposed experimental analysis meant to reveal an answer to the question.

Background for Teachers provides an overview of how the experiment design competition works, requirements for a proposing student team, requirements for proposal submission, and the proposal evaluation criteria.

Background for Student Proposers provides an overview of how to think about the experiment design and proposal process, and requirements for a proposing student team.

Required Specificity for Description of Experiment Samples provides information on how the experiment samples (fluids and/or solids) need to be specified for NASA flight safety review before the experiment can be selected for flight. While the level of specificity described in this document is not required at the time the student teams submit their proposal, it is highly advisable for teams to read this guide and follow the advice provided as closely as possible when writing their proposal in order to avoid any problems if their experiment is selected for flight.

Download: Flight Experiment Proposal Guide secured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: embedded link for Mini-laboratory Operation page changed from Mission 10 to Mission 11; references in text to Mission 10 changed to Mission 11
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

Download: Flight Experiment Proposal Guide: Background for Teacherssecured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: embedded link for Critical Timeline page changed from Mission 10 to Mission 11; deadline for finalist proposal submission changed to reflect Mission 11; references in text to Mission 10 changed to Mission 11
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

Download: Flight Experiment Proposal Guide: Background for Student Proposerssecured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: the reference in the title to “SSEP Mission 7” was made generic to “SSEP Missions”
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 22, 2016 (downloadable above)

Download: Required Specificity for Description of Experiment Samplessecured file
REVISIONS FROM MISSION 10 to MISSION 11: none
Correct Document Revision Date for Mission 11: September 20, 2014 (downloadable above)

 

f. Fluids Mixing Enclosure (FME) Mini-Laboratory Operation
The Fluids Mixing Enclosure (FME) Mini-Laboratory (also called the NanoRacks MixStik) is being used for SSEP Missions to the International Space Station. Each participating community is provided a Package of 5 FME Kits, where each kit has all components needed to assemble a Type 1, 2, or 3 FME. The videoclips below provide an overview of what is inside the package, and how to load and seal the FME mini-labs.

NOTE: The protocol for providing the FedEx Return Airbill, which will be used to return the flight FMEs to experiment teams after return to Earth, has changed since these videos were created.  The new protocol is that NCESSE will complete return airbills for all teams using specifications provided by the teams (e.g., payment information, address, etc.). In order for NanoRacks to ship the flight experiment back to the student team, all information required for NCESSE to complete the return airbill must be received by Stacy Hamel (stacyhamel@ncesse.org) at least 2 weeks prior to return to Earth. 

VIDEO 1 of 3: The Contents of the Mini-Lab Package You Received

 

VIDEO 2 of 3: Loading and Shipping a Type I Mini-Lab

 

VIDEO 3 of 3: Loading and Shipping Type II and III Mini-Labs

The Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP) is a program of the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education internationally. It is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC, which are working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory. SSEP is the first pre-college STEM education program that is both a U.S. national initiative and implemented as an on-orbit commercial space venture.