Scientific Return and Reporting – Mission 10 to ISS

This page provides a video archive of presentations at the annual SSEP National Conference by student researchers whose experiments were part of the SSEP Mission 10 to ISS Casper experiments payload. Mission 10 to ISS was the twelfth SSEP flight opportunity.

Casper is expected to launch on SpaceX-11, NET (No Earlier Than) April 2017, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Casper is also slated to return to Earth on SpaceX-11, splashing down in the Pacific off the California coast, after likely one month aboard ISS.

For details on the flight profile for Casper, see the SSEP Mission 10 to the International Space Station (ISS) page.

Some student flight teams present at more than one annual conference, reporting out status at various stages of the life cycle of a flight experiment. It is also true that not all student flight teams attend a conference. For details on all Casper flight experiments, see the Selected Experiments on SSEP Mission 10 to ISS page.

 

iLEAD Consortium, California

Title: Can Annelid Eggs Hatch in Microgravity?
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
iLEAD Innovations Studios AV, Hart Union High School
Grade levels: 9 and 10

Type of Experiment: Finalist Proposal, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Cleopatra Casillas, Shelby Cooper
Collaborators: Eriq Aquino, Austin Chapa, Shayla Smiley
Teacher Facilitator: Kelly Clark

Abstract: Our experiment was designed to expand the possibilities of crop cultivation of annelids, or vermiculture. Our hypothesis is to determine if the cocoons can hatch in microgravity (mG). Encapsulated Earthworm CocoonsTM will be placed in volume 2 of the Fluids Mixing Enclosure (FME), with water in volume 1, and a fixative in Volume 3. The first douse of water will dissolve the clay encapsulation, the formalin will stop any other unnecessary process from happening.

 

Title: The Effects of Microgravity on Oxidation
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
Santa Clarita Valley International Charter School
Grade level: 11

Type of Experiment: Flight Experiment, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Dustin Fields, Alec Lewis, Kai Turner
Collaborator: Thomas Coussens
Teacher Facilitators: Kathleen Fredette, Zaola Goiri Virto

Abstract: Our SSEP project aims to test the effects of microgravity on the oxidation of iron. By exposing an iron sample to water while in a microgravity environment, we hope to study the effects that microgravity has on the formation of iron oxide. Upon the experiment’s return to Earth, we will be conducting an extensive metallurgical study on the iron oxide that forms. We predict that microgravity will have an effect on how the iron oxide forms.

 

University System of Maryland, Maryland

Title: Investigating Cell Migration under Microgravity Conditions
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Grade levels: 14 and 15

Type of Experiment: Finalist Proposal, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Sylvia Edoigiawerie, Kamsi Odinammadu, Amelia Smith, Beverly Wu
Teacher Facilitator: Dr. Michelle Starz-Gaiano

Abstract: Our experiment seeks to observe the effects of microgravity on cell migration, an important process involved in fighting infection and repairing wounds. Developing eggs in fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, serve as our experimental system due to genetic similarities between fruit flies and humans. Parent flies are sent to the ISS to create offspring whose egg development will occur in microgravity. Upon return from the ISS, ovaries will be stained to analyze our expected results of delayed migration and altered cell machinery.

 

Title: Bacterial Motility in Microgravity
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
University of Maryland, College Park
Grade level: 15

Type of Experiment: Flight Experiment, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Yaniv Kazansky, Aaron Solomon, Garshasb Soroosh
Collaborator: Wade Winkler
Teacher Facilitator: Kenneth Frauwirth

Abstract: Pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria are a threat to long-term space travel, and microgravity has been shown to enhance pathogenicity. This experiment will assess the role of microgravity on expression of pathogenicity genes by bacterium Bacilus subtilis. B. subtilis endospores will be sent to the ISS and activated in microgravity. Growth will be stopped and mRNA will be preserved before reentry. We will analyze mRNA levels (through RNAseq) on the ISS sample and a ground control, providing information on gene expression.

 

Summit, New Jersey

Title: Planarian Re-generagtion in a Microgravity Environment
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
Kent Place School
Grade level: 8

Type of Experiment: Finalist Proposal, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Elizabeth Cotter, Erin Green, Adrianna Guarino, Maya Vuchic
Teacher Facilitator: Wendy Hall

Abstract: This experiment was designed to test the ability of planaria to regenerate in microgravity. The purpose of our experiment was to gather data and apply it to humans in order to create a platform for further research on this topic. Our ground truth results showed successful regeneration of a planarian and their ability to survive in a test tube for extended periods of time. If the planarian had been exposed to a microgravity environment, we expected to find signs of cellular atrophy.

 

Title: The Development of Venessa cardui Butterflies in Microgravity
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
Kent Place School
Grade levels: 5 and 7

Type of Experiment: Flight Experiment, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Alexandra Anderson, Olivia Adamczyk, Isabella Diaz, Nora Lee, Aya Mtume, Abigail Wall, Elizabeth Wyshner
Advisor: Meg Ballard, Ph.D.
Teacher Facilitators: Maura Crowe, Rebecca Van Ry

Abstract: This experiment involves comparing the development of Vanessa cardui (Painted Lady) butterflies from eggs to pupae in microgravity to earth conditions. The butterfly eggs will be refrigerated, which promotes dormancy and delays hatching and development until arrival on the ISS. This study will provide data about insect development and survival in microgravity. Insects are important to life on Earth as pollinators. These results could lead to more natural food production and better oxygen levels on future extended missions.

 

Houston, Texas

Title: The Effect of Microgravity on Shewanella Oneidensis
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
Harmony Science Academy – Houston High School
Grade level: 10

Type of Experiment: Finalist Proposal, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Ayomide Akintola, Esteban Fuentes
Co-Investigators: Abdul Ahtesham, Umar Shakih
Teacher Facilitator: Michael Bowling

Abstract: This experiment was designed to study the effect of gravity on the consumption of metal by the microbe Shewanella Oneidensis. Clamp A will be unclamped on A+2 mixing S. Oneidensis/distilled water with lead. Analysis will include before and after measurements of lead mass and behavioral observation of the microbe.

 

Title: Human Egg Fertilization in Microgravity
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
Harmony Science Academy – Houston High School
Grade level: 10

Type of Experiment: Finalist Proposal, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Paul de Guzman, Alejandro Valdes
Teacher Facilitator: Michael Bowling

Abstract: This experiment was designed to document the effects of microgravity on the process of human fertilization. The experiment proposes to suspend human sperm and eggs in two separate volumes and allow the sperm to fertilize the eggs. To analyze the results, a stereo microscope would be used to visually identify indicators of fertilization. Difficulties in securing materials have delayed conduction of the ground experiment. It is hypothesized that microgravity will affect the fertilization process, but the exact effect cannot be hypothesized.

 

Title: Influence of Microgravity in the Regeneration of the Planarian Species Girardia Dorotocephala
Oral Presentation, 6th Annual SSEP National Conference, June 2016
Harmony Science Academy – Houston High School
Grade level: 10

Type of Experiment: Flight Experiment, Mission 10

Co-Principal Investigators: Ben Appiah, Richard Gomez, Isaiah Ogunmaken, Bassam Razzaq, Matthew Vuong
Teacher Facilitator: Guchmyrat Paytakov

Abstract: This experiment was designed to study the regeneration of living tissue in microgravity environment compared a gravity environment. Severed worms will be sent to ISS, where they would have an allotted amount of time to regenerate on their own. At U-2, a clamp is removed that contains a fixative that will stop regeneration before going back to Earth. Analysis includes measurements of total body length, and total lengths of blastema and regeneration following blastema using a dissecting microscope.

 

The Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP) is a program of the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education internationally. It is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC, which are working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory. SSEP is the first pre-college STEM education program that is both a U.S. national initiative and implemented as an on-orbit commercial space venture.